Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Tools and Dreams

Turners are tool junkies. Really that goes without saying. If you go into the shop of a turner who has been at the craft for more that a year or so, you see chucks, chisels, gouges, skews, parting tools and what not everywhere. I have a couple of racks full. In reality, there are only three main cuts we can make, straight, cove and bead. Everything else is a variation. Allowing for a hollowing tool, most of us so not need half or more of the tools we own. Still there is the dream that given the latest tool, there will come the greatest turning. For that matter, you need the greatest turning to pay for all those tools. Most pros have fewer than the amateurs because the pro can not justify the costs! For me that means I make tools. The satisfaction doubles when you not only turn the piece but also turn it with tools you made.
So what tools work for you and which were a waste of time or money? Let us know.

5 comments:

Mike Burr said...

Darrell,

For me I've been turning a couple of years and I haven't even started serious hollowing yet. I've just moved into doing bowls etc. For the most part I'm still learning to work with the basics of the spindle gouges, skew, round nose scraper, along with mastering my roughing gouge. ;-) However I have 2 tools that deffinately don't fit into the "Standard" mold. That being the Sorby Spindlemaster, and my bowl gouge. I like the ability of the spindle master to make my hands look like I know what I'm doing. And still trying to figure out that bowl thing :-D.

Darrell Feltmate said...

Mike
I hear you. What grind are you using on that bowl gouge? At first I would grind it straight across at 45 degrees, much like aroughing gouge. It is a lot more forgiving than the Irish grind although a touch less versatile.

Mike Burr said...

Darrell,
I'm still using the default factory grind. I did however take my slip stones to it and hone the edge down. I'm still in the process of finding the right spot for my arms before I try to re-shape things. Those Sorby's aren't cheap enough like the HF stuff. But then again I don't have the wood shop that I want just yet. ;-) Still need to move SWMBO van out to do any heavy woodworking.

Darrell Feltmate said...

Mike
Here is a thought or two. First of all, never mind the hone or the whet stones for turning. The edge they leave disappears after the first ten seconds or so. Use an 80 grit aluminum oxide wheel on the grinder and make a jig for it. See my web sitt for it. For a straight grind, use the butt of the tool handle in the jig pocket just like a roughing gouge. For the Irish grind use the holder. It will make sense when you look at the site.

Mike Burr said...

Darrell,
I've got the delta variable speed grinder with the white and grey wheels. I've seen the jigs on your site, just haven't either made the time or settled down long enough to go ahead and build them. "Grin" I have to say though that I like the bowl gouge for making bowls though. My first bowl I made from cypress was done with my spindle gouge and the round nose scraper. The bowl gouge deffinately made the from bubinga a little bit easier to work. I have found for me that in the beginning after I started using the slip stones that it was easier to ride the bevel though.